Archeological Cities

Archeological Cities

 

Bylis

 

Bylis (in today Mallakastra) which is a very important archeological center in Albania, is one of ancient Illyrian citys inhabited by the tribe of Bylliones. Established in the third century B.C., Bylis flourished as a political, economic, and cultural center of the community. The city was governed by an annual council of civil servants. In 230-146 B.C., it introduced bronze coins, which were used throughout this region. The handicrafts from the workshops of Bylis were competing with the handicrafts of Apollonia. The surrounding wall of Bylis, built in the second quarter of the fourth century B.C., is very well-preserved. It is 2250 m long, 3.5 m wide and 8-9 m high and it surrounds an area of 30 ha. The wall is triangular. The city consisted of several quarters and objects, such as the agora, which sheltered the inhabitants of the villages and their wealth in the event of war. It is very interesting to see:

The theatre,which is larger than that of Butrint and was built in the middle of the third century B.C.

The monumental fountain of the 3rd century. – Several stadium elements. – Medieval cultural objects such as Basilica
In the Church of Bylis which was build on the IV-th century AD, the mosaics have Ilirian (Illyrian) motifs which for the church later where known as pagan ones

 

Antigonea

 

Antigonea lies on a hill about 600 meters above sea level

The Agora of the city has been excavated and a Stoa, 59 meters long and 9 m wide has been brought to light.
Coins from various city states have been found in excavations, arriving from Korkyra (modern Corfu), Apollonia, Dyrrachium, Oricum, Ambracia but also the Epirote League, most of them made of bronze and few in silver.
A triconch Palaeo-Christian basilica has been found at the site, dated to the 6th century A.D., and decorated with a mosaic floor.

The Egyptian god Anubis is represented on the central panel of the mosaic, and according to one interpretation it may depict Saint Christopher “the Dog-head”.

 

Butrinti

 

Archaeological Site, perhaps the most romantic archaeological site in Albania. Inhabited since prehistoric times, Butrint has been a Roman city and a bishopric. Following a period of prosperity under Byzantine administration, then a brief occupation by the Venetians, the city was abandoned in the late middle Ages after marshes formed in the area. The present archaeological site is a repository of ruins representing each period in the city’s development.

 

WHAT TO VISIT IN BUTRINTI….

 

TAMPLE OF AESCULAPIUS
THE BAPTISERY
NYMPHEUM
GATE WITH TOWERS

 

Apollonia

 

Situated 12 km from the city of Fier. Illyrian Apollonian was found at the beginning of the 7th century BC by the Greek colonists coming from Corinth and Corcyra. Apollonian was in Roman times, a large and flourishing city near Aos river (today Vjosa). Of great interest to be visited are; The Encircling Wall, the monuments of Agonothetes, the Library, the Odeon, the Portico, the house with mosaics, The Museum of Apollonia, the Church of St. Mary. Unfortunaly, some of the statues and object were appropriated before 1946 by other countries. Those remaining are displayed in the museum, which is housed in the monastery. The monastery courtyard enclosed a Byzantine church dating back to the 14th century.

 

WHAT TO VISIT…

 

THE MUSEUM OF APOLLONIA
THE EXCAVATIONS AND THE MONUMENTS OF APOLLONIA
THE ENCIRCILING WALL
THE TARRACED WALL WITH THE ARCHED GATES
THE MONUMENT OF AGONOTHETES
THE LIBRARY AND THE ODEON
THE PORTICO
THE HOUSE WITH MOSAICS
THE CHURCHE OF St. MARY
THE CHURCHE OF St. MARY

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